Town Times Requester



Stay Connected
Middlefield First Selectman Jon Brayshaw, center, motions to the energy-saving thermostats in the Middlefield Community Center. At their March 18 meeting, the selectmen took a pledge to reduce Middlefield's municipal energy consumption and increase its clean energy purchasing. | (Mark Dionne / Town Times.)

Middlefield takes clean energy pledge


Middlefield officials pledged to attempt to reduce the town’s municipal building energy consumption by at least 20 percent by 2018 and to purchase 20 percent of the town’s energy needs from clean, renewable energy sources by the same year.

The pledge, endorsed by Middlefield’s Board of Selectmen at its March 18 meeting, is part of the Clean Energy Communities program and makes the town eligible for funds called Bright Idea Grants.

“You’re either part of the cure or you’re part of the problem,” said First Selectman Jon Brayshaw before signing the pledge on behalf of the town.

Representatives from the joint Durham-Middlefield Clean Energy and Sustainability Task Force encouraged the town to take the pledge.

Former Middlefield resident Pat Bandzes attended the meeting and supported the program as a community relations specialist for Connecticut Light & Power.

By taking conservation efforts, Middlefield will earn points and those points can be used to earn Bright Idea Grants. According to representatives of the Clean Energy Task Force, Middlefield’s recent efforts could be applied to the program, making Middlefield already eligible for a $5,000 grant.

“I think it’s a great program,” said Selectman Ed Bailey.

“The voluntary nature of it doesn’t commit us to anything.” In addition to being voluntary, the pledge is non-binding.

“There is no penalty if the Town of Middlefield fails to meet the reduction amounts set forth in the schedule,” reads part of the two page pledge.

The program is administered in part by energy companies Connecticut Light & Power, United Illuminated, Yankee Gas, and others as the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund.

Brayshaw noted that Middlefield had been a leader in conservation efforts in the past and described the energy-efficient heating and cooling system working in Middlefield’s community center.

Tangentially, Brayshaw raised the idea that 20 acres of a town-owned 50 acre parcel on Hubbard Street would make good site for a solar farm.

Homeowners also could become part of the program. Middlefield homeowners who put their home through an energy audit earn points for the town.

Publicity for the program will be handled by both the selectmen and the task force.

Durham already participates in the program and has earned a $5,000 grant.

The funds earned through the program must be spent on conservation efforts, including education.



Back to AllNews
Top Stories of the Week

Savings from school closing may be less than expected …
While it is the declining enrollment in District 13 that spurred the movement towards closing Korn Elementary School at the end of the current school … more ...

Liberty Bank robbery sends schools into lockdown …
The Liberty Bank branch at 357 Main Street in Durham was robbed on the afternoon of Thursday, Sept. 3, sending local schools into lockdown status. … more ...

Local students return to the classroom …
On Thursday, Aug. 27, 1,718 students in District 13 returned to school for the 2015-2016 school year. At John Lyman Elementary School, parents, teachers, staff, … more ...

Evening in White a beautiful occasion …
more ...

Makeover on tap for Central Office …
District 13’s Central Office will get a redesign and upgrade starting in October and ending over the December break, according to plans discussed at the … more ...

Comments