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Winter's final stubborn grip brings a snowy cascade to Wadsworth Falls State Park and Wadsworth Brook, off Cherry Hill Road, Middefield. | (Photo by Keith Hagerty)

Old Man Winter wins this weather round


About now you may be longing to trade in your boots for flip flops.

It’s been a challenging winter, with temperatures only a polar bear would love, white-knuckle driving on icy roads, and way too much shoveling. Statistics gleaned from a wide range of weather-related sources tell us we had a right to get a bit cranky with it all.

In Connecticut, for December, January, and February: the average temperature was 26.4 degrees; we had 24 days where the lowest temperature was below 10 degrees; we had 44 days where the highest temperature was below 32 degrees; and we had 50.1 inches of snow (last year we had 47.1 inches). Temperatures averaged below normal and snowfall was above normal averages.

Town Times talked to a few locals, to see how they fared at the hands of Old Man Winter.

Don Bourret: “It got pretty bothersome after a while. The endless cold was the worst of it. My wife, Terry Oakes Bourret, taught her art classes in the house because it was hard trying to heat her studio. It was awkward, transporting her art materials back and forth. I have lived in New England all my life. And the unusual and extreme Artic cold we have experienced this winter seems yet another clear warning of the extraordinary climate changes we can expect in the future. But like everyone else, we survived. And we can’t wait for spring.”

Walter Douglass: “This was a long, tough winter. We lost business because of all the snow. And don’t even talk to me about winter ending. Right now it is 20 degrees with a 40 m.p.h. wind, and it’s snowing. Spring is not happening today, but when it does, I’ll be happy.”

Mary Ann Breininger: “It was a long winter. I’m unemployed right now, so my job was to keep the wood-burning stove going and to keep this little house warm. It was time-consuming; I have to be here for that. So the snow, the cold, being cooped up-it felt overwhelming. I’m glad spring is right around the corner. The warm weather we had a couple of days ago is a tease.”

Diana St. Pierre: “This was probably one of the worst winters we’ve had in a long time because of all the snow. It seemed like we had it constantly, and though I don’t usually mind winter, this one was harder for me. I got tired of shoveling, and I tried not to go out if I didn’t have to. I love spring and I can’t wait for it to get here.”

So what’s in store for us after winter has finished pummeling us? It looks like we’re going to have to hang in there a little bit longer. Here’s the Farmers’ Almanac’s prediction: “Spring will start late and be exceptionally wet for most sections of the country. In the Northeast, the opening days will be greeted with plenty of rain, snow, and cold temperatures. An unseasonably warm patch in mid-April will provide an early taste of spring, but will be short-lived, as a late-season snowstorm follows right on its heels. Cold temperatures will persist through early May, with frequent showers, warming up in time for Memorial Day and the unofficial start of summer.”



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